Sexton, Lee, CCM

Special Reporting
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Current Service Status
USAF Retired
Current/Last Rank
Command Chief Master Sergeant
Current/Last Primary AFSC/MOS
9E000-Senior Enlisted Advisor
Current/Last AFSC Group
Special Reporting
Primary Unit
1998-1998, 9E000, 2nd Bombardment Wing, Heavy
Previously Held AFSC/MOS
99000-Basic Airman
81150-Security Policeman
81170-Security Supervisor
81170-Security Police Supervisor
81199-Security Police Superintendent
81172-Law Enforcement Supervisor
81291-Security Police Superintendent
81271-Law Enforcement and Corrections Supervisor
81100-Security Police Manager
81100-Security Police Chief Enlisted Manager
3P0X1-Security Forces
Service Years
1970 - 1999
Official/Unofficial US Air Force Certificates
Cold War Certificate
Command Chief Master Sergeant

 Official Badges 

Central Command Air Force Security Police Air Training Command Master Instructor (post-1967) Outstanding Airman

Lance P Sijan Award Air Force Security Police Badge (1960-1966) Air Force Retired Air Force Air Police Badge (1960-1966)

Air Training Command Instructor (post-1966)


 Unofficial Badges 

US Air Force Honorable Discharge FBI National Academy Cold War Medal Persian Excursion

US Air Force Honorable Discharge (Old Style)


 Military Association Memberships
Air Force Security Forces Museum Foundation Air Force Security Forces AssociationFBI National Academy Associates (FBINAA)Air Force Association (AFA)
AFSA 615Non Commissioned Officers Association (NCOA)Chapter 93Post 421
Post 5951, BAFB-Johnny Welch Memorial PostChapter 30-National Rifle Association (NRA)Armed Forces Top Enlisted Association (AFTEA)
  1979, Air Force Security Forces Museum Foundation 405
  1984, Air Force Security Forces Association1
  1984, FBI National Academy Associates (FBINAA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1991, Air Force Association (AFA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1991, Air Force Sergeants Association (AFSA), AFSA 615 (Executive Officer) (Barksdale AFB, Louisiana) [Verified] - Chap. Page
  1991, Non Commissioned Officers Association (NCOA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1993, The Retired Enlisted Association (TREA), Chapter 93 (Bossier City, Louisiana)
  1993, FBI National Academy Associates (FBINAA), 208, Louisiana Chapter (Paymaster) - Chap. Page
  1997, American Legion, Post 421 (Vice President) (Bossier City, Louisiana) [Verified] - Chap. Page
  2000, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW), Post 5951, BAFB-Johnny Welch Memorial Post (Bossier City, Louisiana) [Verified] - Chap. Page
  2001, Disabled American Veterans (DAV), Chapter 30 (Shreveport, Louisiana) [Verified]1 - Chap. Page
  2009, -National Rifle Association (NRA)
  2010, Armed Forces Top Enlisted Association (AFTEA) [Verified]


 Additional Information
What are you doing now:

Current Position: State of Louisiana Notary Public - December 2012 to present.
A public officer, appointed and commissioned by the Governor of Louisiana, constituted by law to serve the public in non-contentious matters usually concerned with estates, deeds, powers-of-attorney, and foreign and international business. Main functions are, but not limited to, administering oaths and affirmations, preparing and taking affidavits and statutory declarations, witnessng and authenticating the execution of certain classes of documents. Taking acknowledgments of deeds and other conveyances, protest notes and bills of exchange. Providing notice of foreign drafts, preparing marine or ship's protests in cases of damage  Providing exemplifications and notarial copies, and performing certain other official acts depending on the jurisdiction. Any such act is known as a notarization. The term notary public only refers to common-law notaries and should not be confused with civil-law notaries. With the exceptions of Louisiana, Puerto Rico and Quebec, whose private law is based on civil law, and British Columbia, whose notarial tradition stems from scrivener notary practice, a notary public in the rest of the United States and most of Canada has powers that are far more limited than those of civil-law or other common-law notaries.

Transition Service Officer, Disabled American Veterans (DAV) - Employed 9.5 Years following active duty.
Authorized to appear on behalf of military veterans before all agencies of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and as a full-time employee of the national organization was further delegated and authorized by the National Commander to act as counsel to aid and assist military veterans or their dependents before Federal, State and private agencies when called upon to do so.  Prepared and presented transition briefings supporting the Department of Defense Transition Assistance Program (TAP).  Developed and processes veterans’ claims for earned benefits.  RETIRED - EFFECTIVE 3 August 2010

 

BIOGRAPHY
COMMAND CHIEF MASTER SERGEANT CHALMA LEE SEXTON, JR.
UNITED STATES AIR FORCE (RETIRED)

 
       Command Chief Master Sergeant Chalma Lee Sexton, Jr., was born on August 9, 1950, in New Orleans LA. He retired on 1 February 1999, following almost 29 years of outstanding military service.  His diverse career included service as a Security Forces Manager, Master Instructor and Command Chief Master Sergeant. His tactical leadership of the Air Force Special Emergency Service Flight (AFSESF) and protection of the deposed Shah of Iran, during the 1979 US Embassy hostage crisis, contributed immeasurably to the American captives’ safe repatriation. The Secretary of State, the Air Force Chief of Security Police, and the Director of the US Secret Service personally commended him. Chief Sexton assisted the Headquarters United States Air Force Judge Advocate General’s office in preparing for the landmark US Supreme Court case, Albertini versus the United States. He also led the response to more than 100 anti-nuclear protests, resulting in over 1,200 apprehensions. Chief Sexton developed and coordinated protective service plans and actions supporting the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, the President of the Republic of South Korea, the Queen of England, and, the President of the United States. He was commended and cited for actions incident to protecting the President of the United States.  He is the author of, USAF Chief Master Sergeant Former Prisoners of War and Missing in Action, published by The Airmen Memorial Museum.

        Chief Sexton is a life member of the Air Force Sergeants Association (AFSA), the Noncommissioned Officers Association (NCOA), the Air Force Association (AFA), the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), the American Legion (AL), the Retired Enlisted Association (TREA), the Security Police Museum Foundation and the Disabled American Veterans (DAV). He is also a member of the Federal Bureau of Investigation National Academy Associates (FBINAA), the National Rifle Association (NRA) and a charter member of the Air Force Security Forces Association (AFSFA).

        Chief Sexton and his spouse, Technical Sergeant (USAF/Ret) Leslie Sexton, have one daughter, Heather.
 
EDUCATION:
 
1970 Warren Easton Senior High School, New Orleans LA
1970 Honor Graduate, 3723d Basic Military Training Squadron, Lackland AFB TX
1974 Distinguished Graduate and Class Speaker’s Award Winner, 15th Air Force NCO Leadership School, March AFB CA
1978 Noncommissioned Officers Academy, Lackland AFB TX
1982 Associate in Applied Science Degree in Police Science, Community College of the Air Force, Maxwell AFB AL
1982 Associate in Applied Science Degree in Instructor in Technology, Community of the Air Force, Maxwell AFB AL
1983 Federal Bureau of Investigation National Academy, Quantico Marine Base VA
1984 USAF Senior Noncommissioned Officers Academy, Gunter AFB AL
1987 Associate in Applied Science Degree in Industrial Security, Community College of the Air Force, Maxwell AFB AL
1993 Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice, Brighton University, Honolulu HI
1993 Master of Science Degree in Police Administration, Brighton University, Honolulu HI
1994 Master of Science in Management and Human Resources, Johannine Institute, Boulder CO
 
ASSIGNMENTS:
 
1.  Aug 70-Sep 70, 3723d Basic Military Training Squadron, Lackland AFB TX
2.  Nov 70-Aug 71, Security Police Member, 862d Security Police Squadron, Minot AFB ND
3.  Sep 71-Sep 72, Security Police Entry Controller and Response Force Member, 95th Strategic Air Refueling Wing, Goose AB, Labrador, Canada
4.  Oct 72-Sep 73, Minuteman III Site Security Controller, Response Force Leader/Member and Standardization Evaluation Team Member, 91st Security Police Group, Minot AFB ND
5.  Oct 73-Apr 77, Security Controller, Shift Sergeant, and Noncommissioned Officer in Charge of Information Security, 320th Security Police Squadron, Mather AFB CA
6.  May 77-Aug 83, Technical Instructor, Resident Course Manager/Writer, and Air Force Special Emergency Service Flight Sergeant, 3280th Technical Training Group (USAF Security Police Academy), Lackland AFB TX
7.  Jan 84-Feb 86, First Sergeant, Law Enforcement Superintendent, and Chief Enlisted Manager, 3902d Security Police Squadron, Offutt AFB NE
8.  Mar 86-Oct 87, Operations Superintendent, 1605th Security Police Squadron, Lajes Field, Azores
9.  Nov 87-Jan 90, Operations Officer and Chief Enlisted Manager, 48th Security Police Group, RAF Lakenheath, United Kingdom
10.  Feb 90-Feb 91, Security Police Manager, 833d Security Police Squadron, Holloman AFB NM
11.  Mar 91-Nov 91, Command Chief Master Sergeant, 833d Air Division, Holloman AFB NM
12.  Nov 91-May 92, Command Chief Master Sergeant, 49th Fighter Wing, Holloman AFB NM
13.  Jan 92-Jan 99, Security Forces Manager, 2d Security Forces Squadron, Barksdale AFB LA/Command Chief Master Sergeant, 2nd Bomb Wing, Barksdale AFB LA
 
MAJOR AWARDS AND DECORATIONS:  
 
Meritorious Service Medal with three oak leaf clusters
Air Force Commendation Medal with three oak leaf clusters
Air Force Achievement Medal with one oak leaf cluster
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with eight oak leaf clusters
Air Force Good Conduct Medal with eight oak leaf clusters
Air Force Outstanding Airman of the Year Ribbon
Air Force Recognition Ribbon
Air Force Combat Readiness Medal
National Defense Service Medal with bronze star device
Southwest Asia Service Medal with bronze star device
Air Force Nuclear Operations Support Service Medal with "N" device
Air Force Short Tour Service Ribbon
Air Force Long Tour Service Ribbon with one oak leaf cluster
Air Force Longevity Service Ribbon with six oak leaf clusters
Air Force Professional Military Education Ribbon with two oak leaf clusters
Air Force Small Arms Marksmanship Ribbon with bronze star device
United States Navy Expert Pistol Shot Medal with "E" device
Air Force Training Ribbon
 
OTHER ACHIEVEMENTS:
 
Minot AFB Security Policeman of the Year - 1971
Sacramento Junior Chamber of Commerce Outstanding Young American - 1976
US Jaycees Outstanding Young Men of America - 1976
Mather AFB Security Police Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1976
Mather AFB Wing Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1976
Master Technical Training Instructor  - 1979
Air Force Security Police Academy Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1981
3250th Technical Training Wing Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1981
Air Force Military Training Center (Lackland) Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1981
San Antonio Area Military Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1982
Air Force Association Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1982
3902d Security Police Squadron Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1984
3902d Air Base Wing Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1984
3902d Security Police Squadron Senior SP Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1984
Offutt AFB Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1984
3902d Security Police Squadron Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1985
3902d Air Base Wing Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1985
Master Force Protection Occupational Badge - 1986
Strategic Air Command Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year - 1986
Lance P. Sijan United States Air Force Leadership Award - 1986
Best Large Security Police Group in the United States Air Forces in Europe - 1988
Noncommissioned Officers Association Military Excellence Award - 1991
Tactical Air Command Commander’s Special Medallion - 1992
Louisiana State Governor’s Award for Outstanding Service – 1998
Louisiana Veterans Honor Medal – 2010
Warren Easton High School Hall of Fame – 2012

EFFECTIVE DATES OF PROMOTIONS AND RETIREMENT:

Airman Basic - August 17, 1970
Airman - September 29, 1970
Airman First Class - March 1, 1971
Sergeant - July 1, 1972
Staff Sergeant - April 1, 1974
Technical Sergeant - July 1, 1978                               
Master Sergeant - July 1, 1981
Senior Master Sergeant - July 1, 1984 
Chief Master Sergeant - November 1, 1987
Retired - February 1, 1999           

(Current as of March 20, 2015)


 
 

 

   
Other Comments:
ARMED FORCES/UNIFORMED SERVICES OATH OF ENLISTMENT

In the Active and Reserves


I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.
 

In the National Guard (Army or Air)
 

I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States and the State of (STATE NAME) against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the Governor of (STATE NAME) and the orders of the officers appointed

 

It’s the Law
 

Federal law requires everyone who enlists or re-enlists in the Armed Forces of the United States to take the enlistment oath. The oath of enlistment into the United States Armed Forces is administered by any commissioned officer to any person enlisting or re-enlisting for a term of service into any branch of the military. The officer asks the person, or persons, to raise their right hand and repeat the oath after him. The oath is traditionally performed in front of the United States Flag and other flags, such as the state flag, military branch flag, and unit guidon may be present.

 

NOTE: There has been some controversy about whether the phrase "So help me God" is mandatory. I have seen officers allow enlistees to omit these words, if they choose, according to their religious preference and beliefs. While federal law does not appear to make any part of the oath optional (see Title 10, Section 502 of the United States Code), military regulations often do. For example, the Army enlistment regulation (see Army Regulation 601-210, paragraph 6-18) makes the portion "So help me God" optional.
 

History of the Oath of Enlistment
 

During the Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress established different oaths for the enlisted men of the Continental Army.
 

The first oath, voted on 14 June 1775 as part of the act creating the Continental Army, read:
 

I _____ have, this day, voluntarily enlisted myself, as a soldier, in the American continental army, for one year, unless sooner discharged: And I do bind myself to conform, in all instances, to such rules and regulations, as are, or shall be, established for the government of the said Army.
 

The original wording was effectively replaced by Section 3, Article 1, of the Articles of War approved by Congress on 20 September 1776, which specified that the oath of enlistment read:
 

I _____ swear (or affirm as the case may be) to be trued to the United States of America, and to serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies opposers whatsoever; and to observe and obey the orders of the Continental Congress, and the orders of the Generals and officers set over me by them.


The first oath under the Constitution was approved by Act of Congress 29 September 1789 (Sec. 3, Ch. 25, 1st Congress). It applied to all commissioned officers, noncommissioned officers and privates in the service of the United States. It came in two parts, the first of which read:

"I, A.B., do solemnly swear or affirm (as the case may be) that I will support the constitution of the United States."

The second part read:

"I, A.B., do solemnly swear or affirm (as the case may be) to bear true allegiance to the United States of America, and to serve them honestly and faithfully, against all their enemies or opposers whatsoever, and to observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States of America, and the orders of the officers appointed over me."

The next section of that chapter specified that "the said troops shall be governed by the rules and articles of war, which have been established by the United States in Congress assembled, or by such rules and articles of war as may hereafter by law be established."

 

The 1789 enlistment oath was changed in 1960 by amendment to Title 10, with the amendment (and current wording) becoming effective in 1962.


Much of the above information courtesy of the Army's Center for Military History.

Reference: Rod Powers, About.com Guide

 

ARTICLES OF THE UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES CODE OF CONDUCT

I

I am an American, fighting in the forces which guard my country and our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their defense.

II

I will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I will never surrender the members of my command while they still have the means to resist.

III

If I am captured I will continue to resist by all means available. I will make every effort to escape and to aid others to escape. I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy.

IV

If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners. I will give no information or take part in any action which might be harmful to my comrades. If I am senior, I will take command. If not, I will obey the lawful orders of those appointed over me and will back them up in every way.

V

When questioned, should I become a prisoner of war, I am required to give name, rank, service number, and date of birth. I will evade answering further questions to the utmost of my ability. I will make no oral or written statements disloyal to my country and its allies or harmful to their cause.

VI

I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United States of America.
 

BACKGROUND AND HISTORY
    
The Code of Conduct for members of the Armed Forces of the United States was first promulgated by President Dwight D. Eisenhower on August 17, 1955. The code, including its basic philosophy, was reaffirmed on July 8, 1964, in Department of Defense Directive No. 1300.7. In March 1988, President Ronald Reagan issued Executive Order 12633, amending the code with language that is gender-neutral. The code, although first expressed in written form in 1955, is based on time-honored concepts and traditions that date back to the days of the American Revolution.

 

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE CORE VALUES


INTEGRITY FIRST

SERVICE BEFORE SELF

EXCELLENCE IN ALL WE DO
 

THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRMAN’S CREED
 

“I am an American Airman.
I am a Warrior.
I have answered my nation's call.

 

I am an American Airman.
My mission is to fly, fight, and win.
I am faithful to a proud heritage,
a tradition of honor,
and a legacy of valor.

I am an American Airman,
Guardian of freedom and justice,
My nation's sword and shield,
Its sentry and avenger.
I defend my country with my life.

I am an American Airman:
Wingman, Leader, Warrior.
I will never leave an Airman behind.
I will never falter,
and I will not fail.”

 

NOTE:  In  2007, the above version of the United States Air Force, “Airman’s Creed,” replaced all other, “creeds,” within the service department.

 

 

   
 Photo Album   (More...


 Ribbon Bar


Security Force (Master)
Security Police (Master)


 
 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
Click here to see Training
  1970, Basic Military Training (Lackland AFB, TX), 3723/8973
 Unit Assignments
3723rd Basic Military Training SquadronAir Force Training WingsAir Training Command862nd Security Police Squadron
5th Bombardment Wing, Heavy15th Air ForceStrategic Air Command (SAC)1001st Security Police Squadron
Headquarters Command (HQ USAF)Strategic Air Command (SAC)95th Strategic WingSecond Air Force (2nd Air Force)
91st Missile Security Squadron91st Missile Wing15th Air Force320th Security Police Squadron
320th Bombardment WingUS Air ForceSchool AssignmentsUS Air Force
School AssignmentsProfessional Schools and Courses3287th Technical Training SquadronUSAF Security Police Academy/Combat Studies Branch
Training UnitsAir Training CommandNCO Academy - ATC  Lackland AFBSchool Assignments
Lackland Military Training Center (LMTC)School AssignmentsFBI National AcademyStrategic Air Command (SAC)
Security Police UnitsSenior Noncommissioned Officer Academy (SNCOA)55th Security Police Squadron1605th Security Police Squadron
1605th Military Airlift Support WingMilitary Airlift Command (MAC)21st Air Force48th Security Police Squadron
48th Fighter WingUnited States Air Forces in Europe (COMUSAFE/USAFE)3rd Air Force48th Security Police Group
833rd Security Police SquadronTactical Air Command (TAC)12th Air Force833rd Air Division
49th Fighter Wing2nd Security Police Squadron2nd Bombardment Wing, HeavyAir Combat Command
8th Air Force4404th Security Police Squadron (Provisional)4404th Composite Wing (Provisional)United States Central Command Air Forces (USCENTAF)
2nd Security Forces Squadron
  1970-1970, 99000, 3723rd Basic Military Training Squadron
  1970-1970, 99000, 3700th Basic Military Training Wing
  1970-1970, 99000, Air Training Command
  1970-1971, 81150, 862nd Security Police Squadron
  1970-1971, 81150, 5th Bombardment Wing, Heavy
  1970-1971, 81150, 15th Air Force
  1970-1977, 81150, Strategic Air Command (SAC)
  1970-1999, 9E000, 1001st Security Police Squadron
  1970-1999, 3P0X1, Air Force Office of Security Police (AFOSP)
  1971-1972, 81150, 95th Security Police Squadron
  1971-1972, 81150, 95th Strategic Wing
  1971-1972, 81150, Second Air Force (2nd Air Force)
  1972-1973, 81150, 91st Missile Security Squadron
  1972-1973, 91st Missile Wing
  1972-1973, 81150, 15th Air Force
  1973-1977, 81170, 320th Security Police Squadron
  1973-1977, 81150, 320th Bombardment Wing
  1973-1977, 81150, 15th Air Force
  1974-1974, Air Force Supervisors Course
  1974-1974, 81150, Non-Commisioned Officer Leadership School (NCOLS)
  1977-1977, 81150, Air Force OJT Trainer/Supervisor Course
  1977-1977, 81170, Technical Training Instructors Course (TTIC)
  1977-1977, 81170, Air Base Ground Defense Level I Course
  1977-1980, 81170, 3287th Technical Training Squadron
  1977-1981, 81199, USAF Security Police Academy/Combat Studies Branch
  1977-1981, 3287th Technical Training Squadron
  1977-1981, 81170, Lackland Military Training Center (LMTC)
  1977-1983, 81199, 3750th Technical Training Wing
  1978-1978, 81172, NCO Academy - ATC Lackland AFB
  1978-1978, 81170, USAF Security Police Academy/Tactics for Neutralization Teams
  1978-1978, 81170, Air Base Ground Defense Level II Course
  1979-1979, 81170, USAF Security Police Academy/Tactics for Emergency Service Teams
  1980-1980, 81170, Air Base Ground Defense Level IV Course
  1980-1980, 81291, Air Base Ground Defense Command Course
  1980-1980, 81271, USAF Security Police Academy/Tactics for Emergency Service Teams
  1981-1981, 81199, Basic Sensor Operator Training Course
  1981-1983, 81199, 3282nd Technical Training Squadron
  1981-1983, 81199, Lackland Military Training Center (LMTC)
  1983-1983, 81170, Security Police Superintendent's Course
  1983-1983, 81199, FBI National Academy
  1983-1986, 81199, Strategic Air Command (SAC)
  1983-1986, 81199, 3902nd Security Police Squadron
  1984-1984, 81199, Senior Noncommissioned Officer Academy (SNCOA)
  1985-1985, 81199, Hostage Negotiations
  1985-1985, Hostage Negotiations
  1986-1986, 81199, 55th Security Police Squadron
  1986-1987, 81199, 1605th Security Police Squadron
  1986-1987, 81199, 1605th Military Airlift Support Wing
  1986-1987, 81199, Military Airlift Command (MAC)
  1986-1987, 81199, 21st Air Force
  1987-1988, 81100, 48th Security Police Squadron
  1987-1989, 81100, 48th Fighter Wing
  1987-1989, 81100, United States Air Forces in Europe (COMUSAFE/USAFE)
  1987-1989, 81100, 3rd Air Force
  1988-1989, 81100, 48th Security Police Group
  1989-1991, 3P0X1, 833rd Security Police Squadron
  1989-1992, 9E000, Tactical Air Command (TAC)
  1989-1992, 9E000, 12th Air Force
  1991-1991, 9E000, 833rd Air Division
  1991-1992, 9E000, 49th Fighter Wing
  1992-1996, 3P0X1, 2nd Security Police Squadron
  1992-1999, 3P0X1, 2nd Bombardment Wing, Heavy
  1992-1999, 3P0X1, Air Combat Command
  1992-1999, 8th Air Force
  1995-1996, 3P0X1, 4404th Security Police Squadron (Provisional)
  1995-1996, 3P0X1, 4404th Composite Wing (Provisional)
  1995-1996, 3P0X1, United States Central Command Air Forces (USCENTAF)/USCENTAF Force Protection Cell
  1996-1999, 3P0X1, 2nd Security Forces Squadron
  1998-1998, 9E000, 2nd Bombardment Wing, Heavy
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1979-1979 Operation Eagle (Iran)11
  1990-1991 Gulf War (Iraq)19
  1995-1996 Operation Southern Watch (Iraq)
 Colleges Attended 
Minot State UniversityEl Paso Community CollegePikes Peak Community CollegeUniversity of Maryland at College Park
Sacramento City CollegeCommunity College of the Air ForceSaint Phillips College, San Antonio TXCommunity College of the Air Force
University of VirginiaCommunity College of the Air Force
  1970-1970, Minot State University
  1971-1972, El Paso Community College
  1971-1972, Pikes Peak Community College
  1972-1973, University of Maryland at College Park
  1974-1974, Sacramento City College
  1977-1982, Community College of the Air Force
  1982-1982, Saint Phillips College, San Antonio TX
  1982-1982, Community College of the Air Force
  1983-1984, University of Virginia
  1985-1987, Community College of the Air Force
  1992-1993, Others/Not Listed
  1994-1994, Others/Not Listed
 My Aircraft/Missiles
B-52 Stratofortress (Buff)  KC-135 Stratotanker  F-106 Delta Dart  KC-135 Stratotanker  
KC-97 Stratotanker  LGM-30G Minuteman III Missile  AGM-28 Hound Dog Missile  B-52 Stratofortress (Buff)  
C-32 (Air Force Two)  C-130 Hercules  EC-135 Looking Glass  EC-135  
E-4 Nightwatch  RC-135 Cobra Ball  EC-135H Silk Purse  KC-135 Stratotanker  
F-111 Aardvark  F-15 Eagle/Strike Eagle  T-38 Talon  F-117 Nighthawk  
HH-60 Pave Hawk  KC-135 Stratotanker  AGM-86 ALCM Missile  AGM-69 SRAM  Missile  
AGM-129 ACM Missile  AGM-142 Have Nap/Popeye Missile  ADM-20 Quail Missile  A-10 Thunderbolt II (Warthog)  
EC-130 Volant/Commando Solo  AGM-84D Harpoon Missile  B-52 Stratofortress (Buff)  C-130 Hercules  
EC-130H Compass Call  C-130 Hercules  F-16 Fighting Falcon  HC-130 Hercules  
  1970-1971, B-52 Stratofortress (Buff)
  1970-1971, KC-135 Stratotanker
  1971-1972, B-52 Stratofortress (Buff)
  1971-1972, KC-135 Stratotanker
  1971-1972, F-106 Delta Dart
  1971-1972, KC-135 Stratotanker
  1971-1972, KC-135 Stratotanker
  1971-1972, KC-97 Stratotanker
  1972-1973, LGM-30G Minuteman III Missile
  1973-1977, B-52 Stratofortress (Buff)
  1973-1977, AGM-28 Hound Dog Missile
  1973-1977, B-52 Stratofortress (Buff)
  1979-1979, C-32 (Air Force Two)
  1980-1983, C-130 Hercules
  1983-1986, EC-135 Looking Glass
  1983-1986, EC-135
  1984-1986, E-4 Nightwatch
  1984-1986, RC-135 Cobra Ball
  1986-1987, EC-135H Silk Purse
  1986-1987, KC-135 Stratotanker
  1987-1989, F-111 Aardvark
  1989-1991, F-15 Eagle/Strike Eagle
  1989-1992, T-38 Talon
  1991-1992, F-117 Nighthawk
  1992-1992, HH-60 Pave Hawk
  1992-1993, KC-135 Stratotanker
  1992-1994, KC-135 Stratotanker
  1992-1999, B-52 Stratofortress (Buff)
  1992-1999, AGM-86 ALCM Missile
  1992-1999, AGM-69 SRAM Missile
  1992-1999, AGM-129 ACM Missile
  1992-1999, AGM-142 Have Nap/Popeye Missile
  1992-1999, ADM-20 Quail Missile
  1992-1999, A-10 Thunderbolt II (Warthog)
  1992-1999, EC-130 Volant/Commando Solo
  1992-1999, AGM-84D Harpoon Missile
  1992-1999, B-52 Stratofortress (Buff)
  1995-1996, C-130 Hercules
  1995-1996, EC-130H Compass Call
  1995-1996, C-130 Hercules
  1995-1996, F-16 Fighting Falcon
  2003-2003, A-10 Thunderbolt II (Warthog)
  2003-2003, HC-130 Hercules
 Other News, Events and Photographs
 
  Aug 03, 2010, Retirement - Transition Service Officer (TSO), Disabled American Veterans (DAV)328
  Nov 05, 2010, Warren Easton Senior High School Class of 1970 Fortieth Reunion 152
  Feb 12, 2011, Mardi Gras Ball - Shreveport LA140
  Oct 24, 2011, Military Events - Post Retirement484
  May 18, 2012, Warren Easton Charter High School New Orleans LA - Hall of Fame Inductions 201271
  Jun 12, 2012, General Photos6
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