Aderholt, Harry Clay, Brig Gen

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Brigadier General
Last Primary AFSC/MOS
1111A-Pilot
Last AFSC Group
Aircrew
Primary Unit
1942-1943, M 0273, USAAF Flying Training Command
Service Years
1942 - 1976
Brigadier General

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

10 kb

Home State
Alabama
Alabama
Year of Birth
1920
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by SSgt Robert Bruce McClelland, Jr. to remember Aderholt, Harry Clay, Brig Gen.

If you knew or served with this Airman and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Birmingham, Alabama
Last Address
Fort Walton Beach, Florida

Date of Passing
May 20, 2010
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Burial Unknown

 Official Badges 

Air Force Commander Air Training Command Instructor (pre-1966) Combat Crew Air Force Retired




 Unofficial Badges 

Cold War Medal




 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

Brig. Gen. Harry C. "Heinie" Aderholt (1920 - 2010)

  
 
Brig. Gen. (Ret.) Harry C. "Heinie" Aderholt passed away May 20, 2010, at his home, surrounded by family, loyal friends and his devoted caregiver, Jamie Newman..
He was born on Jan. 6, 1920, in Birmingham, Ala., to Forest Aderholt and Katie Banholzer and was preceded in death by his loving wife of 56 years, Jessie; brothers, Roy Aderholt and Robert Aderholt; and sister, Cornelia Akin.
He is survived by his wife, Anne; daughter, Janet Lynn Elliott and husband Chaplain Col. (Ret.) Richard G. Elliott Jr. of Panama City, Fla.; son, George Aderholt and wife Pat of Navarre, Fla.; one sister, Katherine McDaniel of Trussville, Ala.; two brothers, Warren Aderholt and his wife Bunny of Marietta, Ga., and Louis Aderholt of Huntsville, Ala.; grandchildren, Kevin Richard Elliott and wife Kathy Anderson Elliott, Stacie Lynn Elliott, Kellie Marie Elliott and Mark Randall Elliott; great-granddaughter, Annie Lynn Elliott; and several nieces and nephews.
Heinie was one of seven children raised by his widowed mother (his father died, as a result of an accident, when Heinie was just a boy of nine), and he learned very early in life many lessons that would shape his future. Undoubtedly, his mother's influence from her strength, courage, love and strict discipline, provided him with the solid foundation that helped him to grow and develop into the remarkable man he became.
Heinie's love of people was obvious and his sincerity and straight forward, up-front approach encouraged the development of many life-long friendships. None more enduring than the bond of love, loyalty and mutual respect that he shared with Maj. Gen. Richard Secord.
We wish to thank his faithful friend, Joseph Caruth, who enabled him to continue his early morning ritual of working out at Aderholt Fitness Center.
Until his final days he remained close to his brothers and sister and their families. As recently as late January, he made a trip to Bir-mingham, on to Huntsville, then to Atlanta, assuring all he would be back soon.
Gen. Aderholt's 30-plus year military career is legendary. His status as a leader, his many accomplishments, awards and citations will be recorded in the annals of military history.
His innumerable friends will remember him as a man of integrity with a loving heart who inspired and touched so many lives.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations in memory of Gen. Aderholt be made to the McCoskrie Threshold Foundation, P.O. Box 67, Mary Esther, FL 32569, to support projects in Thailand and Laos.
A special thank you to the staff at Davis-Watkins Funeral Home.
A memorial service will be held at Hurlburt Air Park on July 2 at 9 a.m. 
Published in Northwest Florida Daily News on May 22, 2010


 
 

 
  
   
Other Comments:
Sources:
USAF bio
goefoundation.org/index.php/eagles/biographies/a/aderholt-harry/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_C._Aderholt
http://bobandeva.com/mil/Air_Commandos.htm
   
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Korean War
Start Year
1950
End Year
1953

Description
The Korean War; 25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953) began when North Korea invaded South Korea. The United Nations, with the United States as the principal force, came to the aid of South Korea. China came to the aid of North Korea, and the Soviet Union gave some assistance.

Korea was ruled by Japan from 1910 until the closing days of World War II. In August 1945, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, as a result of an agreement with the United States, and liberated Korea north of the 38th parallel. U.S. forces subsequently moved into the south. By 1948, as a product of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States, Korea was split into two regions, with separate governments. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate government of all of Korea, and neither side accepted the border as permanent. The conflict escalated into open warfare when North Korean forces—supported by the Soviet Union and China—moved into the south on 25 June 1950. On that day, the United Nations Security Council recognized this North Korean act as invasion and called for an immediate ceasefire. On 27 June, the Security Council adopted S/RES/83: Complaint of aggression upon the Republic of Korea and decided the formation and dispatch of the UN Forces in Korea. Twenty-one countries of the United Nations eventually contributed to the UN force, with the United States providing 88% of the UN's military personnel.

After the first two months of the conflict, South Korean forces were on the point of defeat, forced back to the Pusan Perimeter. In September 1950, an amphibious UN counter-offensive was launched at Inchon, and cut off many of the North Korean troops. Those that escaped envelopment and capture were rapidly forced back north all the way to the border with China at the Yalu River, or into the mountainous interior. At this point, in October 1950, Chinese forces crossed the Yalu and entered the war. Chinese intervention triggered a retreat of UN forces which continued until mid-1951.

After these reversals of fortune, which saw Seoul change hands four times, the last two years of conflict became a war of attrition, with the front line close to the 38th parallel. The war in the air, however, was never a stalemate. North Korea was subject to a massive bombing campaign. Jet fighters confronted each other in air-to-air combat for the first time in history, and Soviet pilots covertly flew in defense of their communist allies.

The fighting ended on 27 July 1953, when an armistice was signed. The agreement created the Korean Demilitarized Zone to separate North and South Korea, and allowed the return of prisoners. However, no peace treaty has been signed, and the two Koreas are technically still at war. Periodic clashes, many of which are deadly, have continued to the present.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1950
To Year
1951
 
Last Updated:
Jan 24, 2013
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  861 Also There at This Battle:
  • Adams, Billy H., Capt, (1944-1970)
  • Adams, Harold (Jim), TSgt, (1951-1971)
  • Adler, Junior Merle, 1st Lt, (1950-1951)
  • Adolf, Gerald, 1stSgt, (1953-1980)
  • Austin, Arthur Myles, Maj, (1939-1951)
  • Ballard, Dewey, Col
  • Bennett, Jr., Chauncey Aubrey, Capt, (1950-1951)
  • Bolstad, Richard Eugene, Col, (1948-1979)
  • Brann, Donald, TSgt, (1946-1968)
  • Broughton, Jacksel Markham, Col, (1942-1968)
  • Brown, James, SMSgt, (1951-1978)
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