Zaniewski, Felix J., Brig Gen

Deceased
 
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Last Rank
Brigadier General
Last Primary AFSC/MOS
8811-Judge Advocate, Staff
Last AFSC Group
Legal Professional
Primary Unit
1974-1979, 8811, Strategic Air Command (SAC)
Service Years
1942 - 1979
Brigadier General

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Connecticut
Connecticut
Year of Birth
1920
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by A3C Michael S. Bell to remember Zaniewski, Felix J., Brig Gen.

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Contact Info
Home Town
New Haven
Last Address
Schertz, TX

Date of Passing
Jan 01, 2006
 
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Section 30 Grave 531-LH

 Official Badges 

Secretary of Defense Service Air Force Commander Headquarters Air Force WW II Honorable Discharge Pin

Air Force Retired


 Unofficial Badges 

US Air Force Honorable Discharge US Army Honorable Discharge




 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
BRIGADIER GENERAL FELIX J. ZANIEWSKI


 
 

Retired March 25, 1979.   Died Jan. 1, 2006.




Brigadier General Felix J. Zaniewski is the staff judge advocate, Strategic Air Command, with headquarters at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. In this capacity, he is legal adviser to the staff and commander in chief of SAC.

General Zaniewski was born in 1920, in New Haven, Conn., where he graduated from Hillhouse High School in 1938. He graduated from the University of Connecticut with a bachelor of arts degree and a commission as second lieutenant through the Reserve Officers Training Corps program in 1942. He received his juris doctorate from the University of Virginia in 1948.

He entered active military duty in May 1942, attended an infantry refresher course at Spartanburg, S.C., and then was assigned to the 1st Infantry Division as assistant provost marshal. He departed the United States in August 1942 with the 1st Infantry Division and served continuously with the division during World War II in England, Scotland and the invasions and campaigns in North Africa and Sicily. The division returned to England in preparation for the invasion of the European Continent, and he remained with the 1st Infantry Division throughout the invasion of Northern France and through the campaigns in France, Belgium and Germany. In April 1944 he was transferred to Headquarters V Corps. He participated in the V Corps campaigns through Germany into Czechoslovakia and returned to the United States with the V Corps in July 1945.

General Zaniewski separated from active duty in January 1946, became a member of the Army Reserve, and in 1949 transferred to the Air Force Reserve.

Following his admission to the Connecticut Bar, he was employed in January 1949 by the U.S. Air Force Office of the Judge Advocate General at the Pentagon as an attorney adviser. In November 1949 he accepted an appointment as a trial examiner with the Interstate Commerce Commission. He next returned to employment with the U.S. Air Force, Office of the Judge Advocate General.

General Zaniewski was recalled to active duty in November 1952 and served as chief of the Publications Division, Office of the Judge Advocate General. In August 1956 he was assigned as staff judge advocate of Clark Air Base in the Philippines. He graduated from the Air Command and Staff College in June 1960 and was appointed staff judge advocate at Bolling Air Force Base, D.C.

He served as staff judge advocate, 32d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, Soesterberg, Netherlands, from June 1964 through June 1967; and staff judge advocate of Dover Air Force Base, Del., from June 1967 until June 1969.

He was deputy chief of the Military Affairs Division, Office of the Judge Advocate General, U.S. Air Force at the Military Personnel Center, Randolph Air Force Base, Texas, from July 1969 until June 1970, when he assumed duties as chief of the division.

In September 1971, General Zaniewski was appointed staff judge advocate for Fifteenth Air Force at March Air Force Base, Calif., and served in that position until he assumed duties as staff judge advocate for the Military Airlift Command with headquarters at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., in June 1973.

General Zaniewski was assigned to Headquarters Strategic Air Command, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., as the staff judge advocate in February 1974.

General Zaniewski is admitted to practice before all the courts of the State of Connecticut, the U.S. Court of Military Appeals, and The Supreme Court of the United States. He is a member of the American Bar Association.

His military decorations and awards include the Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal with oak leaf cluster, Air Force Commendation Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Ribbon with oak leaf cluster, French Croix de Guerre, and the Belgian and French Fourrageres.

General Zaniewski's hometown is Schertz, Texas.

He was promoted to the grade of brigadier general effective May 1, 1973, with date of rank April 28, 1973.


ZANIEWSKI, FELIX J 
BRIG GEN   US AIR FORCE
VIETNAM
DATE OF BIRTH: 11/20/1920
DATE OF DEATH: 01/01/2006
BURIED AT: SECTION 30  SITE 531 LH
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

ZANIEWSKI, DOROTHY MALCOLM
DATE OF BIRTH: 09/11/1924
DATE OF DEATH: 03/14/2001
BURIED AT: SECTION 30  SITE 531 LH
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY
WIFE OF ZANIEWSKI, FELIX JOHN BRIG GEN   US AIR FORCE

   
Other Comments:
He was a friend of my father. The general, his daughter and my friend Peggy, my father Win Pehrson and my self were all involved in the Exploring program of the boy scouts in Omaha, Nebraska. In 1976 Peggy and I and my parents went to Washington, DC and visited Arlington. How ironic I would be referring to it now. The two of us went on to attend the University of Nebraska - Lincoln. If there is anyway you can forward this message to Margaret (Peggy) Zaniewski. I would very much appreciate it. It would be nice to hear from her. I hated to lose touch. I will pay my regards next time I am in Washington, DC. I now live in New Hampshire. Thanks again.
 
Regards,
Diane Pehrson-Fusco
   
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World War II
Start Year
1941
End Year
1945

Description
Overview of World War II 

World War II killed more people, involved more nations, and cost more money than any other war in history. Altogether, 70 million people served in the armed forces during the war, and 17 million combatants died. Civilian deaths were ever greater. At least 19 million Soviet civilians, 10 million Chinese, and 6 million European Jews lost their lives during the war.

World War II was truly a global war. Some 70 nations took part in the conflict, and fighting took place on the continents of Africa, Asia, and Europe, as well as on the high seas. Entire societies participated as soldiers or as war workers, while others were persecuted as victims of occupation and mass murder.

World War II cost the United States a million causalities and nearly 400,000 deaths. In both domestic and foreign affairs, its consequences were far-reaching. It ended the Depression, brought millions of married women into the workforce, initiated sweeping changes in the lives of the nation's minority groups, and dramatically expanded government's presence in American life.

The War at Home & Abroad

On September 1, 1939, World War II started when Germany invaded Poland. By November 1942, the Axis powers controlled territory from Norway to North Africa and from France to the Soviet Union. After defeating the Axis in North Africa in May 1941, the United States and its Allies invaded Sicily in July 1943 and forced Italy to surrender in September. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, the Allies landed in Northern France. In December, a German counteroffensive (the Battle of the Bulge) failed. Germany surrendered in May 1945.

The United States entered the war following a surprise attack by Japan on the U.S. Pacific fleet in Hawaii. The United States and its Allies halted Japanese expansion at the Battle of Midway in June 1942 and in other campaigns in the South Pacific. From 1943 to August 1945, the Allies hopped from island to island across the Central Pacific and also battled the Japanese in China, Burma, and India. Japan agreed to surrender on August 14, 1945 after the United States dropped the first atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Consequences:

1. The war ended Depression unemployment and dramatically expanded government's presence in American life. It led the federal government to create a War Production Board to oversee conversion to a wartime economy and the Office of Price Administration to set prices on many items and to supervise a rationing system.

2. During the war, African Americans, women, and Mexican Americans founded new opportunities in industry. But Japanese Americans living on the Pacific coast were relocated from their homes and placed in internment camps.

The Dawn of the Atomic Age

In 1939, Albert Einstein wrote a letter to President Roosevelt, warning him that the Nazis might be able to build an atomic bomb. On December 2, 1942, Enrico Fermi, an Italian refugee, produced the first self-sustained, controlled nuclear chain reaction in Chicago.

To ensure that the United States developed a bomb before Nazi Germany did, the federal government started the secret $2 billion Manhattan Project. On July 16, 1945, in the New Mexico desert near Alamogordo, the Manhattan Project's scientists exploded the first atomic bomb.

It was during the Potsdam negotiations that President Harry Truman learned that American scientists had tested the first atomic bomb. On August 6, 1945, the Enola Gay, a B-29 Superfortress, released an atomic bomb over Hiroshima, Japan. Between 80,000 and 140,000 people were killed or fatally wounded. Three days later, a second bomb fell on Nagasaki. About 35,000 people were killed. The following day Japan sued for peace.

President Truman's defenders argued that the bombs ended the war quickly, avoiding the necessity of a costly invasion and the probable loss of tens of thousands of American lives and hundreds of thousands of Japanese lives. His critics argued that the war might have ended even without the atomic bombings. They maintained that the Japanese economy would have been strangled by a continued naval blockade, and that Japan could have been forced to surrender by conventional firebombing or by a demonstration of the atomic bomb's power.

The unleashing of nuclear power during World War II generated hope of a cheap and abundant source of energy, but it also produced anxiety among large numbers of people in the United States and around the world.
   
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From Year
1942
To Year
1945
 
Last Updated:
Nov 16, 2013
   
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  5158 Also There at This Battle:
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  • Adair, William, Sgt, (1943-1946)
  • Adams, Billy H., Capt, (1944-1970)
  • Adcock, David, 1st Lt, (1942-1945)
  • Agin, Thomas, SSgt, (1942-1949)
  • Ainsworth, John, Capt, (1942-1946)
  • Alcorn, Cecil Clyde, SSgt, (1941-1945)
  • Alcorn, Ernest Merton, TSgt, (1942-1945)
  • Alenier, Stanley J., 2nd Lt, (1942-1944)
  • Allen, George, Cpl, (1944-1946)
  • Allen, Herman Fredrick, Col, (1942-1945)
  • Allen, William Harry, Maj, (1942-1963)
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