Kahl, Frank, Sgt

Fallen
 
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Last Rank
Sergeant
Last Primary AFSC/MOS
AAF MOS 611-Aerial Gunner
Last AFSC Group
Air Crew (Enlisted)
Primary Unit
1942-1943, AAF MOS 611, 32nd Bombardment Squadron, Heavy
Service Years
1942 - 1943
Sergeant

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Year of Birth
1920
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by CMSgt Don Skinner-Deceased to remember Kahl, Frank, Sgt.

If you knew or served with this Airman and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
32nd Bomb Squadron

Casualty Date
Jan 07, 1943
 
Cause
Hostile, Died while Missing
Reason
Air Loss, Crash - Land
Location
Tunisia
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
Conesta Memorial Park - Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Section K, Lot 563, Grave 5

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World War II Fallen
  1943, World War II Fallen

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World War II/European-African-Middle Eastern Theater/Egypt-Libya Campaign (1942-43)
Start Year
1942
End Year
1943

Description
(Egypt-Libya Campaign 11 June 1942 to 12 February 1943) When the United States entered World War II in December 1941, the British had been fighting German and Italian armies in the Western Desert of Egypt and Libya for over a year. In countering an Italian offensive in 1940, the British had at first enjoyed great success. In 1941, however, when German forces entered the theater in support of their Italian ally, the British suffered severe reversals, eventually losing nearly all their hard-won gains in North Africa.

Even though the United States had not yet entered the war as an active combatant, by the time General Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, commander of the German Army’s Afrika Korps, began his offensive against the British Eighth Army in Libya in March 1941, the American and British air chiefs were already discussing American support for the British Eighth Army. Rommel’s rapid and unexpected success in the Libyan desert forced British and American staff officers

in London to accelerate their planning. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his advisers also agreed that the British might need American support in the Middle East. Overall theater responsibility would continue to be British, but the President recognized that a British collapse in Egypt would have far-reaching implications and approved contingency measures to prepare for American support to the theater at a future date.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1942
To Year
1942
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

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