Houck, John W., Jr., 1st Lt

Fallen
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
View Time Line
Last Rank
First Lieutenant
Last Primary AFSC/MOS
AAF MOS 1054-Co-Pilot, Four-Engine Aircraft
Last AFSC Group
Pilot (Officer)
Primary Unit
1942-1943, AAF MOS 1054, 353rd Bombardment Squadron, Heavy
Service Years
1941 - 1943
USAAFOfficer Collar Insignia
First Lieutenant

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Michigan
Michigan
Year of Birth
Not Specified
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by CMSgt Don Skinner-Deceased to remember Houck, John W., Jr., 1st Lt.

If you knew or served with this Airman and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
353rd Bomb Squadron
St. Donat, Algeria

Casualty Date
Apr 18, 1943
 
Cause
Hostile, Died while Missing
Reason
Air Loss, Crash - Sea
Location
Italy
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
North Africa American Cemetery and Memorial - Carthage, Tunisia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Walls of the Missing

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
World War II Fallen
  1943, World War II Fallen



Air Offensive, Europe Campaign (1942-44)/Operation Strangle
From Month/Year
March / 1943
To Month/Year
January / 1944

Description
Operation Strangle was a series of air interdiction operations during the Italian Campaign of World War II by the United States Fifteenth and Twelfth Air Forces to interdict German supply routes in Italy north of Rome from March 24, 1943, until the fall of Rome in spring 1944. Its aim was to prevent essential supplies from reaching German forces in central Italy and compel a German withdrawal. The strategic goal of the air assault was to eliminate or greatly reduce the need for a ground assault on the region. Although the initial goal of forcing the enemy to withdraw was not achieved, the air interdiction of Operation Strangle played a major role in the success of the subsequent ground assault Operation Diadem.

Two principal interdiction lines were maintained across the narrow boot of Italy. This meant that no through trains were able to run from the Po Valley to the front line, and that south of Florence substantially all supplies had to be moved by truck. The operation employed medium bombers and fighter bombers over a 150-square-mile (390 km2) area from Rome to Pisa and from Pescara to Rimini.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
March / 1943
To Month/Year
December / 1943
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  284 Also There at This Battle:
Copyright Togetherweserved.com Inc 2003-2011