Bostwick, George Eugene, Col

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
151 kb
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Last Rank
Colonel
Last Primary AFSC/MOS
AAF MOS 1055-Pilot, Single-Engine Fighter
Last AFSC Group
Pilot (Officer)
Primary Unit
1946-1946, AAF MOS 1065, 63rd Fighter Squadron - Panthers
Service Years
1941 - 1963
Officer Collar Insignia
Colonel


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

203 kb

Home State
Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Year of Birth
1919
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by SSgt Robert Bruce McClelland, Jr. to remember Bostwick, George Eugene, Col USAF(Ret).

If you knew or served with this Airman and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Dayton, Ohio
Last Address
Fort Worth, Texas

Date of Passing
Feb 06, 1990
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified
Military Service Number
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

Commander


 Unofficial Badges 

Cold War Medal Air Ace American Fighter Aces Congressional Gold Medal


 Military Associations and Other Affiliations
American Fighter Aces AssociationAir Force Memorial (AFM)
  1961, American Fighter Aces Association
  2016, Air Force Memorial (AFM) - Assoc. Page


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
In WWII he was credited with destroying 8 enemy aircraft in aerial combat plus 2 damaged and 6 destroyed on the ground.
Little is known about his post-war career in the USAAF/USAF except that he was stationed in OH; AL; La Jolla, CA; and Chateauroux, France.  He was promoted to Lt. Col. Oct 19, 1950 and to Col. Apr 15, 1953. It is also known that beside the BS at Stanford (years unknown), he got an MS in Industrial Engineering (school & years unknown, possibly also Stanford.)
The location of his remains is unknown.

Synopsis of his Silver Star citation:
Awarded for actions during World War II
(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: George E. Bostwick, United States Army Air Forces, was awarded the Silver Star for conspicuous gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with the EIGHTH Air Force in the European Theater of Operations during World War II.

General Orders: Headquarters, 8th Air Force, General Orders No. 489 (1944)

Service: Army Air Forces

Division: 8th Air Force


This Remembrance is based upon, and credited to, the research of USMF member Ian Phillips "Sabrejet" (user name) which may be seen at this link: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=58080&hl= 
   
Other Comments:
Sources:
http://www.cieldegloire.com/014_bostwick_g_e.php
http://www.cieldegloire.com/fg_056.php
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/56th_Operations_Group#World_War_II
http://www.56thfightergroup.co.uk/
http://valor.militarytimes.com/recipient.php?recipientid=45849
http://www.littlefriends.co.uk/gallery.php?Group=56
https://www.americanairmuseum.com/person/75734
https://www.ancestry.com
 
   
 Photo Album   (More...



WWII - European Theater of Operations/Air Offensive, Europe Campaign (1942-44)
From Month/Year
July / 1942
To Month/Year
June / 1944

Description
Air Offensive, Europe Campaign 4 July 1942 to 5 June 1944) Pre-war doctrine had held that waves of bombers hitting enemy cities would cause mass panic and the rapid collapse of the enemy. As a result, the Royal Air Force had built up a large strategic bomber force. By way of contrast, Nazi German air force doctrine was almost totally dedicated to supporting the army. Therefore, German bombers were smaller than their British equivalents, and Germany never developed a fully successful four engined heavy bomber equivalent to the Lancaster or B-17, with only the similarly sized Heinkel He 177 placed into production and made operational for such duties with the Luftwaffe in the later war years.

The main concentration of German raids on British cities was from September 7, 1940 until May 10, 1941 in the most famous air battle of all time, known as the Battle of Britain. Facing odds of four against one the RAF held off the mighty Luftwaffe forcing Hermann Wilhelm Göring to withdraw his forces and more importantly indefinitely postpone invasion plans. This proved the first major turning point of the War. After that most of the strength of the Luftwaffe was diverted to the war against the Soviet Union leaving German cities vulnerable to British and later American air bombings. As a result of the victory, Great Britain was used by U.S and other Allied forces as a base from which to begin the D-Day landings in June 1944 and the liberation of Nazi-occupied Western Europe. 

From 1942 onwards, the efforts of Bomber Command were supplemented by the Eighth Air Force of the United States Army Air Forces, U.S. Army Air Forces units being deployed to England to join the assault on mainland Europe on July 4, 1942. Bomber Command raided by night and the US forces by day. 
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
January / 1944
To Month/Year
June / 1944
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
Units Participated in Operation

762nd Bombardment Squadron, Heavy

355th Wing - Desert Lightning

 
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  695 Also There at This Battle:
  • Brown, Melvin, 1st Lt, (1943-1945)
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