Taylor, Richard, MSgt

Aircraft Maintenance
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Current Service Status
USAF Retired
Current/Last Rank
Master Sergeant
Current/Last Primary AFSC/MOS
43191-Aircraft Maintenance Superintendent
Current/Last AFSC Group
Aircraft Maintenance
Primary Unit
1978-1983, 43191, 47th Air Division
Previously Held AFSC/MOS
43131E-Apprentice Aircraft Mechanic
43010-Aircraft Maintenance Helper
43151E-Aircraft Mechanic
43151E-Aircraft Engine Mechanic
43171E-Aircraft Maintenance Technician
Service Years
1963 - 1983
Master Sergeant


 Ribbon Bar


Aircrew Enlisted (Basic)


 

 Official Badges 

Air Force Retired


 Unofficial Badges 

Cold War Medal SAC Master Technician Master Crew Chief Munitions Recovery Team Chief

US Air Force Honorable Discharge (Old Style) KC-135 2000 Hour Young Tiger Task Force


 Military Association Memberships
The Retired Enlisted Association (TREA)Air Force Sergeants Association (AFSA)American LegionVeterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW)
Disabled American Veterans (DAV)Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA)
  1995, The Retired Enlisted Association (TREA)
  1995, Air Force Sergeants Association (AFSA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1997, American Legion [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2000, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2002, Disabled American Veterans (DAV) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2002, Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page


 Additional Information
What are you doing now:
Just finished writing my Memoir of my service years, and a major undertaking of doing a re-write of the family military history (1770's to 1983.  Being the last member of my family to serve, probably puts me at the pinacle.  Hopefully the kids who are just now growing old enough to understand willspend the time to read both and accept the challenge of returning the favor of securing our freedom for their grandkids.
   
Other Comments:
I served as an Aircraft Maintenance Ground Crewman, Assistant Crew Chief, Crew Chief and Aircraft Maintenance Superintendant.  Crew Chief Duties were on B-52H, KC-EC-RC-WC-135, C-141A and Enroute Maintenance Team Chief for all MAC - boy that's OLD - aircraft, including Commercials, transiting through Andersen AFB, Guam 1968 thru 1969.  My last assignment was Night Shift NCOIC Production and Mobility for the Field Maintenance Branch, 6th CAMSq, 6th Strategic Recon. Wing, Eielson AFB, AK.

After my retirement I went to work for the State of Alaska as a Correctional Officer/Prisoner Transport Officer for another fifteen years.  Received my Commission from the Alaska State Troopers in 1985 and retired it in 1997.  Retired from the DOC in 1998.

Drove School Bus for a year, and then went into Private Security.  Worked two years under the Federal Protective Service as a Security Officer/Sergeant at the U. S. Federal Building in Fairbanks, AK.  Retired due to health.

Moved back to Michigan in 2004 to pursue my dream of completion of a degree in drafting.  When it's over I'm going back to Alaska and ship my two sons to Florida.    LMAO.

Just a note:  Crew Chiefs went by numerous nicknames while I was in that line of work.  Some readily identifiable examples were "Ramp Apes", "Screw Chiefs", "AGE Monitors", "Gorilla," and so on.  Along about 1980 something, I first heard the term "Crew Dawg" used by an Aircraft Commander.  When asked what that really meant, he replied "Dedicated, Able, Worthy, Guardian!"  I agreed.  The "DAWG" is the man or woman who has an awesome responsibility.

   

 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
  1963, Basic Military Training (Lackland AFB, TX), 37072
 Unit Assignments
Air Training Command3300th Technical Training Wing3707th Basic Military Training SquadronTraining Units
28th Organizational Maintenance Squadron28th Bombardment Wing, Heavy821st Air DivisionStrategic Air Command (SAC)
4082nd Strategic Wing45th Air Division8th Air Force95th Strategic Wing
Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Units322nd Airlift Division21st Air Force602nd Organizational Maintenance Squadron
60th Military Airlift WingMilitary Airlift Command (MAC)31st Air Rescue SquadronUnited States Pacific Air Forces (PACAF)
US Air Force605th Military Airlift Support Squadron3rd Air Division40th Air Division
Second Air Force (2nd Air Force)449th Bombardment Wing, HeavyStrategic Air Command (SAC)12th Air Division
6th Strategic Wing14th Air Division15th Air Force6th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing
6th Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance SquadronStrategic Air Command (SAC)47th Air Division
  1963-1963, 43131E, Headquarters, Air Training Command
  1963-1963, 43131E, 3300th Technical Training Wing
  1963-1963, 3707th Basic Military Training Squadron
  1963-1963, 43010, 3366th School Squadron
  1963-1965, 43151E, 28th Organizational Maintenance Squadron
  1963-1965, 43151E, 28th Bombardment Wing, Heavy
  1963-1965, 43151E, 821st Air Division
  1963-1967, 43151E, Strategic Air Command (SAC)
  1965-1966, 43151E, 4082nd Strategic Wing
  1965-1966, 43151E, 45th Air Division
  1965-1967, 43151E, 8th Air Force
  1966-1967, 43151E, 95th Strategic Wing
  1966-1967, 43151E, 95th Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron
  1967-1968, 43151E, 322nd Airlift Division
  1967-1968, 43151E, 21st Air Force
  1967-1968, 43151E, 602nd Organizational Maintenance Squadron
  1967-1968, 43151E, 60th Military Airlift Wing
  1967-1968, 43151E, 602nd Organizational Maintenance Squadron
  1967-1969, 43171E, Military Airlift Command (MAC)
  1968-1968, 43151E, 31st Air Rescue Squadron
  1968-1969, 43171E, United States Pacific Air Forces (PACAF)
  1968-1969, 43171E, 61st Military Airlift Wing
  1968-1969, 43171E, 605th Military Airlift Support Squadron
  1969-1969, 43171E, 3rd Air Division
  1969-1969, 43171E, 3rd Air Division Detachment 1, 3rd Air Division
  1969-1971, 40th Air Division
  1969-1971, 43171E, Second Air Force (2nd Air Force)
  1969-1971, 43171E, 449th Bombardment Wing, Heavy
  1969-1983, 43191, Strategic Air Command (SAC)
  1971-1971, 43171E, 12th Air Division
  1971-1975, 43171E, 6th Strategic Wing
  1971-1975, 43171E, 14th Air Division
  1975-1978, 43171E, 28th Bombardment Wing, Heavy
  1978-1983, 15th Air Force
  1978-1983, 43191, 6th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing
  1978-1983, 43191, 6th Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron
  1978-1983, 43191, Strategic Air Command (SAC)
  1978-1983, 43191, 47th Air Division
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1961-1973 Vietnam War
 Military Association Memberships
The Retired Enlisted Association (TREA)Air Force Sergeants Association (AFSA)American LegionVeterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW)
Disabled American Veterans (DAV)Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA)
  1995, The Retired Enlisted Association (TREA)
  1995, Air Force Sergeants Association (AFSA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1997, American Legion [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2000, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2002, Disabled American Veterans (DAV) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2002, Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page


 Remembrance Profiles -  9 Airmen Remembered
 Photo Album   (More...


Reflections on MSgt Taylor's US Air Force Service
 
 Reflections On My Service
 
PLEASE DESCRIBE WHO OR WHAT INFLUENCED YOUR DECISION TO JOIN THE AIR FORCE.
I grew up in the tiny village of Curtis in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The population in those days was about one hundred and fifty year around residents. During the summers, since the village rests between two fairly large and good fishing lakes, the population of tourists and vacationers would increase
MSgt Richard Taylor (Dawg) - Please describe who or what influenced your decision to join the Air Force.
the population to around fifteen thousand. During the summer of 1951, three U. S. Air Force Airmen jumped out of a C-119 with a Mobile Command Post/Navigation Checkpoint Trailer and a Willy's Jeep over my home town of Curtis, MI. They set up the trailer in front of my mother's house early the next morning. Being somewhat inquisitive, I wanted to know what they were doing so I checked, and made friends with the three Airmen quickly. Soon I was getting to listen to and talk to B-36 pilots flying long range missions headed north.

I introduced one of the three guys to my best friend's aunt, they soon married, within a year, and a lifetime friendship has existed ever since. This airman, George (Bill) Kelly, a Canadian by birth, later left the U. S. Air Force and entered the Canadian Armed Forces and advanced to the rank of Group Captain. His friendship nearly cost me my "Buck Sergeant" stripes in 1966. But that's another story. Also, two home town men of my older brother's age were in the Air Force. Captain William Gowan, who was a F-100 fighter pilot and a member of the Original Mach Breakers Club, and then still Captain Francis J. Feneley who was shot down over Hanoi in 1966, often talked to me about going into the Air Force when they were home on leave. Captain Bill Gowan convinced me not to join the Navy in the summer of 1962. I followed Bill and Francis' advice and enlisted with every intention of going career in June of 1963, and I've never regretted that decision.
WHETHER YOU WERE IN THE SERVICE FOR SEVERAL YEARS OR AS A CAREER, PLEASE DESCRIBE THE DIRECTION OR PATH YOU TOOK. WHAT WAS YOUR REASON FOR LEAVING?
After Basic Training at Lackland AFB, TX, I attended Basic Aircraft Maintenance School, B-47E's, and a short familiarization course in Jet Engines, J-47's and J'57's at Amarillo AFB, TX. From there it was on to the 28th OMS and 28th Bomb Wing at Ellsworth AFB, S. D., Dec 1963-Nov 65 working on B-52D's, KC and EC-135's, a TDY to Forbes AFB, KS for training on RC-135A's and RB-47H's, then to the 4082nd/95th CAMSq (OMB,) 4082nd and 95th Strategic Wing(s) at Goose AB, Canada Nov 1965 to Feb 67 to work on RB-47H's and KC-135's, 602nd OMS, 60th Military Airlift Wing at Travis AFB, CA March 1967 to March 68 for training on, and to be a Crew Chief on C-141A's, then off to the 61st Military Airlift Wing, and the 605th Military Airlift Support Squadron at Andersen AFB, Guam from March of 1968 to Sept 69 to work as an Enroute Maintenance Team Chief for all MAC aircraft, including Commercial Flights transiting the Pacific Theater of Operations and South East Asia. We handled all kinds of aircraft there.

From Twin engine propellers to four engine jets, Foreign AF's and our own, plus Civilian MAC contract flights into and out of South East Asia. That encompassed about sixty percent of the flights into and out of Okinawa, Vietnam and Thailand. From Andersen I went to the 449th OMS and the 449th Bomb Wing at Kincheloe AFB, MI as a B-52H Crew Chief and Assistant Bomber Flight Chief from November of 1969 to March of 71, from Kincheloe I went to the 6th CAMSq, 6th Strategic Wing at Eielson AFB, AK to work as an Assistant Crew Chief and later Crew Chief on RC-135C, D, S, U and V's from March of 1971 to November of 75. In November of1975 I returned to the 28th OMS and 28th Bomb Wing at Ellsworth AFB, S. Dakota to Crew Chief EC-135C 'Looking Glass', B-52G's and five KC-135AVIII SEA Radio Relay (COMBAT LIGHTNING) aircraft that were returning to the US and going through de-modification back to standard tankers. In August of 1978 I returned to the 6th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing as NCOIC of the TDY KC-135 Crew Chief Section of Organizational Maintenance Branch until July of 1979, then to the Field Maintenance Branch as NCOIC Repair and Reclamation Shop until October of 1981, and finally as Superintendent of all Field Maintenance, Night Shift. I retired on 1 September of 1983.
IF YOU PARTICIPATED IN ANY MILITARY OPERATIONS, INCLUDING COMBAT, HUMANITARIAN AND PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS, PLEASE DESCRIBE THOSE WHICH MADE A LASTING IMPACT ON YOU AND, IF LIFE-CHANGING, IN WHAT WAY?
I was assigned to the Operation Foreign Legion Task Force, the forerunner to Young Tiger, which was to provide Air Refueling Support to our fighter aircraft in South Vietnam, Don Mueang Airport, Bangkok, Thailand in the spring and early summer of 1965. I supported combat operations from Guam in 1968 and 69 while training for my 'Seven Level' while temporarily assigned to the 4133rd Bomb Wing (Provisional) in July and August of 1968, and supported the Vietnam/SEA Airlift from Travis AFB, CA and Andersen AFB, GU from March of 1967 through August 1969.

Working as a Crew Chief on B-52D's at Guam and watching them take off and land twenty four seven for those eighteen months I was there had a profound effect on me. Watching your aircraft depart with 108 500# bombs on board and return empty thirteen hours later, watching two of the bombers crash between May and September of 1969 also had a big effect on me. Working on literally more than three hundred each of Air Evac and Remains Return C-141 flights while at Travis and Guam was probably the roughest duty I ever had because we also helped load and unload the patients and remains when they had to transfer from one aircraft to another.
FROM YOUR ENTIRE MILITARY SERVICE, DESCRIBE ANY MEMORIES YOU STILL REFLECT BACK ON TO THIS DAY.
I'd have to say, the most positive memory of my career would be garnering the honor of accepting a new RC-135S from LTV-E-Systems at Greenville, TX in 1972. I was a three year Staff Sergeant and Assistant Crew Chief of an RC-135D at Eielson AFB, AK, and my supervisor, then T/Sgt., and Mentor, Jack Harris, had me picked to fly down with another Sgt. to accept the airplane out of modification from an ARIA platform to the Cobra Ball II platform. She was big, beautiful and smelled like a brand new car. What an honor for a 'New Guy' in the unit to get that task.
OF ALL THE MEDALS, AWARDS, FORMAL PRESENTATIONS AND QUALIFICATION BADGES YOU RECEIVED, OR OTHER MEMORABILIA, WHICH ONE IS THE MOST MEANINGFUL TO YOU AND WHY?
My Air Crew Member Wings. I always wanted to fly, and when my Squadron Commander made me a part of his crew and helped me earn my wings I fulfilled a dream.
WHICH INDIVIDUAL(S) FROM YOUR TIME IN THE MILITARY STAND OUT AS HAVING THE MOST POSITIVE IMPACT ON YOU AND WHY?
MSGT Joseph Teasdale, Goose Air Base, Canada. As a young Airman Second Class who wanted to know more and do better, Joe took me aside one day and told me that I think too much, but that he saw me as a future Master Sergeant because I was always trying to figure out what hadn't gotten done that day, and because I wanted to finish the job.
CAN YOU RECOUNT A PARTICULAR INCIDENT FROM YOUR SERVICE, WHICH MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE BEEN FUNNY AT THE TIME, BUT STILL MAKES YOU LAUGH?
YES! It was 1969. An APOLLO Mission was on the moon, and I was on Guam and was coming back to the barracks from the NCO Club after a night of partying with a friend when he suddenly turned around, looked up at the sky and yelled 'C'mon Back! It's Okay Now!' We laughed ourselves silly over that, and he and I have a good laugh over that about twice a year, even today.
WHAT PROFESSION DID YOU FOLLOW AFTER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW? IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY SERVING, WHAT IS YOUR PRESENT OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY?
MSgt Richard Taylor (Dawg) - What profession did you follow after your military service and what are you doing now? If you are currently serving, what is your present occupational specialty?
Civilian Law Enforcement, Alaska Department of Corrections with a commission from the Alaska State Troopers. I served fifteen years with DOC, eleven and a half as a fully commissioned Officer.
WHAT MILITARY ASSOCIATIONS ARE YOU A MEMBER OF, IF ANY? WHAT SPECIFIC BENEFITS DO YOU DERIVE FROM YOUR MEMBERSHIPS?
Vietnam Veterans of America, Life Member, Air Force Sergeants Association, Life Member, The Retired Enlisted Association, Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion, Disabled American Veterans Association, Life Member.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS SERVING IN THE MILITARY INFLUENCED THE WAY YOU HAVE APPROACHED YOUR LIFE AND YOUR CAREER? WHAT DO YOU MISS MOST ABOUT YOUR TIME IN THE SERVICE?
Being in the military taught me to study hard and work harder at whatever task I was assigned, that honesty in your dealings with others brings the rewards of comradeship and friendship, and that perseverance is the best teacher.
BASED ON YOUR OWN EXPERIENCES, WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO THOSE WHO HAVE RECENTLY JOINED THE AIR FORCE?
Create in yourself a pride in your service and maintain it in your everyday image. Study hard, perfect your on the job techniques, encourage others in your peer group to excel in their jobs as well, and help them achieve this goal if you can.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS TOGETHERWESERVED.COM HELPED YOU REMEMBER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND THE FRIENDS YOU SERVED WITH.
MSgt Richard Taylor (Dawg) - In what ways has TogetherWeServed.com helped you remember your military service and the friends you served with.
TWS and The USAF
Since joining the Air Force-TogetherWeServed website and 'Family' I have met and become friends with a whole host of other Air Force folks, made contact with some guys I knew when I was at my first real active duty assignment, and have enjoyed the camaraderie of the first ever AFTWS reunion in Dayton., OH. That alone was a big hit because we also got to meet one of our Marine Corps 'Brothers', Sergeant Gene Wilt.

The overall attitude and friendliness of the site, and those who are there is simply amazing, and the whole experience, at least to me, seems to lend itself to a desire to participate in any way one can, either through the forums, searching for old friends, or just learning about what others have done while in their military service. Its been a truly amazing experience.

DS 3/16/17

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