Clark, Donald E., TSgt

Human Resources
 
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Life Member
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Current Service Status
USAF Veteran
Current/Last Rank
Technical Sergeant
Current/Last Primary AFSC/MOS
73273-Personnel Systems Management Technician
Current/Last AFSC Group
Human Resources
Primary Unit
1975-1976, 73273, 96th Combat Support Group
Previously Held AFSC/MOS
73230-Apprentice Personnel Specialist
99015-Unclassified Airman
73250-Personnel Specialist
73250A-Personnel Specialist
73270A-Personnel Technician
Service Years
1956 - 1976
Enlisted Collar Insignia
Technical Sergeant


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 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
Post 34Chapter 125Chapter 291Air Force Memorial (AFM)
  1998, American Legion, Post 34 (Vice President) (El Reno, Oklahoma) - Chap. Page
  2004, The Retired Enlisted Association (TREA), Chapter 125 (Midwest City, Oklahoma)
  2014, Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA), Chapter 291 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) [Verified] - Chap. Page
  2015, Air Force Memorial (AFM) [Verified] - Assoc. Page


 Additional Information
What are you doing now:
My wife and I travel as much as possible. Have been to several foreign countries and need 1 more state to have visited all 50 States. Have got to see all Major League Baseball teams play at least once. 
   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   
 Countries Deployed To or Visited

 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
Click here to see Training
  1956, Basic Military Training (Parks AFB, CA), 3275/237
 Unit Assignments/ Advancement Schools
Training UnitsAir Force Training WingsUS Air Force832nd Combat Support Group
Technical Training Center - Chanute7th Airlift Wing14th Special Operations WingAir Base Units
Military Airlift Command (MAC)Air Force Office of Aerospace Research3201st Air Base Group8th Tactical Fighter Wing - Wolf Pack
509th Bombardment Wing, MediumCombat Support Units
  1956-1956, 99015, 3275th Basic Military Training Squadron (Cadre)
  1956-1956, 73230, 3310th Technical Training Wing (Staff)
  1956-1958, 73250, 450th Fighter-Day Wing
  1958-1960, 73250, 832nd Combat Support Group
  1960-1965, 73250A, Technical Training Center - Chanute
  1965-1966, 73250A, 7th Airlift Wing
  1966-1967, 73250A, 14th Special Operations Wing
  1967-1968, 73250A, 375th Air Base Group
  1968-1969, 73270A, Military Airlift Command (MAC)
  1969-1970, 73270A, Air Force Office of Aerospace Research
  1970-1973, 73270A, 3201st Air Base Group
  1973-1974, 73273, 8th Tactical Fighter Wing - Wolf Pack
  1974-1975, 73273, 509th Bombardment Wing, Medium
  1975-1976, 73273, 96th Combat Support Group
 Military Association Memberships
Post 34Chapter 125Chapter 291Air Force Memorial (AFM)
  1998, American Legion, Post 34 (Vice President) (El Reno, Oklahoma) - Chap. Page
  2004, The Retired Enlisted Association (TREA), Chapter 125 (Midwest City, Oklahoma)
  2014, Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA), Chapter 291 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) [Verified] - Chap. Page
  2015, Air Force Memorial (AFM) [Verified] - Assoc. Page

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Reflections on TSgt Clark's US Air Force Service
 
 Reflections On My Service
 
PLEASE DESCRIBE WHO OR WHAT INFLUENCED YOUR DECISION TO JOIN THE AIR FORCE.
In May 1956 as graduation from Noble High School approached, I knew I didn't want to go to college. I also knew I was going to have to find some way to make a living. A few of my friends were thinking about joining the Marines but I didn't think that was for me. Charles Brooks and I decided to go see the Air Force recruiter and it sounded like the Air Force would be a good choice. We both decided to go Air Force and that turned out to be a very good decision for us. We are now both retired Air Force.

I remember early on the morning of 4 Jun 1956, we boarded the Greyhound Bus and headed for St. Louis. Later that day we were sworn into the USAF and put on a train bound for Parks AFB, California and Basic Training. Those first few days opened up a whole new world for a farm boy from Illinois. I still think it was the best decision for me.
WHETHER YOU WERE IN THE SERVICE FOR SEVERAL YEARS OR AS A CAREER, PLEASE DESCRIBE THE DIRECTION OR PATH YOU TOOK. WHAT WAS YOUR REASON FOR LEAVING?
My entire career in the Air Force was in the Personnel career field. I graduated from Personnel school at Scott AFB, Ill. My first job was a records clerk and later a morning report clerk. Later I got into the computer end and operated a key punch machine, a sorter and printers.

While I was stationed in Thailand I crossed trained to the Personnel Systems Management field, AFSC 73273. I was a Personnel System Manager (PSM) until my retirement.
IF YOU PARTICIPATED IN ANY MILITARY OPERATIONS, INCLUDING COMBAT, HUMANITARIAN AND PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS, PLEASE DESCRIBE THOSE WHICH MADE A LASTING IMPACT ON YOU AND, IF LIFE-CHANGING, IN WHAT WAY?
My job in the CBPO didn't offer any reasons to be directly engaged in combat operations. I guess the closest I came was while stationed at Tan Sob Nhut. One night the VC launched a mortar attack on the base. We had enough lead time to go to our shelters and after the attack was over and we emerged from our shelters, only to find our barracks had been hit. That night made me realize how important all those hours of filling sand bags and making bunkers really was. Also it made for a very memorable evening although not a very pleasant one.
OF ALL YOUR DUTY STATIONS OR ASSIGNMENTS, WHICH ONE DO YOU HAVE FONDEST MEMORIES OF AND WHY? WHICH WAS YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I would say Eglin AFB, Fla was my favorite duty assignment. Mainly because it was a beautiful area with lots of sandy beaches and lots of things to do. Also I had a great bunch of people to work for and a great group of people who worked for me. A truly wonderful and fun time while I was there.

I would be remiss, if I didn't mention my tour in Vietnam. It was not my fondest tour but I think it was very important to me. It was one of the reason I was in the service. Even though I never actually engaged in combat, I got to know several who were. I know this was not a popular war back in the USA, I still think we were over there doing a job that needed to be done. Many brave people gave their lives and I will always be proud I was there.

The least favorite would have to be Whiteman AFB, Mo. Not much going on at Knob Noster, Mo. Did enjoy the people I came into contact with.
FROM YOUR ENTIRE MILITARY SERVICE, DESCRIBE ANY MEMORIES YOU STILL REFLECT BACK ON TO THIS DAY.
In 1972 while stationed at Eglin AFB, Fla I had the privilege and honor to be nominated and receive the Air Force System Commands Outstanding Personnel Technician Award. It was a great honor, not only for me but the entire CPBO.
WHAT PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF FROM YOUR MILITARY CAREER?
I received 5 Air Force Commendation Medals and 1 Meritorious Service Medal. These were earned by doing my job in a meritorious way.
OF ALL THE MEDALS, AWARDS, FORMAL PRESENTATIONS AND QUALIFICATION BADGES YOU RECEIVED, OR OTHER MEMORABILIA, WHICH ONE IS THE MOST MEANINGFUL TO YOU AND WHY?
The Meritorious Service Medal was the most meaningful to me. All the Air Force Commendation Medal were special also but to me the MSM meant a great deal to me.
WHICH INDIVIDUAL(S) FROM YOUR TIME IN THE MILITARY STAND OUT AS HAVING THE MOST POSITIVE IMPACT ON YOU AND WHY?
There were many individual's during my career that really helped me develop as the years went by. My very first boss, M/Sgt Morris I Stevens, later while at Chanute AFB, Ill M/sgt Clyde Ridgeway made a very deep impression on me. While in Thailand, I had the privilege of working for Captain Charles B. Sharp and SM/Sgt Myron Cochran, both were great individuals and great to work for. Then years later while at Dyess AFB, Tx I had the privilege of working for Major Jenkins and CM/Sgt Robinson, two of the finest individuals i ever meet.

I think I saved the best for last because the finest people I worked for was at Eglin AFB, Fla. The list is headed by SM/Sgt Sandy Loman, Captain Enid Mock, CM/Sgt George Ireland and last but not least LtCol Jeffrey McDougall. It was these people and others to numerous to name that made me enjoy by career so very much.
WHAT PROFESSION DID YOU FOLLOW AFTER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW? IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY SERVING, WHAT IS YOUR PRESENT OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY?
After my retirement, I went to work for the Dayton Tire and Rubber Company which was located in Oklahoma City, OK. We were a subsidiary of Firestone Rubber Company which a few years later was purchased by the Bridgestone Rubber Company. I worked there for 27 years at various jobs and enjoyed most of the time I spent there. Did meet a lot of great people and many I count as friends still today. I retired from there 1 Apr 2003.

Since my retirement from Bridgestone, my wife and I have been traveling as much and often as we can. We both really enjoy the retired life and are looking forward to traveling to many more places.
WHAT MILITARY ASSOCIATIONS ARE YOU A MEMBER OF, IF ANY? WHAT SPECIFIC BENEFITS DO YOU DERIVE FROM YOUR MEMBERSHIPS?
I belong to The Retired Enlisted Association and the American Legion. I look forward to reading their magazines each month. It helps me keep up on what is happening in the military now.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS SERVING IN THE MILITARY INFLUENCED THE WAY YOU HAVE APPROACHED YOUR LIFE AND YOUR CAREER? WHAT DO YOU MISS MOST ABOUT YOUR TIME IN THE SERVICE?
I know that my career in the Air Force was a great molding experience for me. It taught me responsibility and the importance of doing a job correctly. I know I carried these traits with me into my civil career and am sure, they were the reason I succeeded in the civilian world. I know for a fact, I am a much bigger and better person because of the military and because of that I am very thankful I chose the military as my first career.
BASED ON YOUR OWN EXPERIENCES, WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO THOSE WHO HAVE RECENTLY JOINED THE AIR FORCE?
From day one, listen and learn all you can from the NCO's and Officers you come in contact with. The advice and knowledge will do you a world of good, not only in the military but in the civilian world as well. I suggest you think seriously about a military career.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS TOGETHERWESERVED.COM HELPED YOU REMEMBER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND THE FRIENDS YOU SERVED WITH.
TSgt Donald E. Clark - In what ways has TogetherWeServed.com helped you remember your military service and the friends you served with.
TWS and the US Air Force
The website has brought back many memories of people and places that I hadn't thought about in years. I have only found one person who I was stationed with in the past but it has been great being able to talk to him about things we both shared a good many years ago. Hopefully there will be more reunions in the years to come.

DS 4/21/17

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